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Shadbolt Centre For The Arts With Coastal Salish Vitality and VSO Performing at Spirit Square

July 7, 2010

There is a new First Nations public art piece at the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, named after Jack Leonard Shadbolt, the renowned BC artist/teacher/author/poet. It is a work by Thomas Cannell, a Coast Salish artist. His sculpture consists of four individual basalt slabs about 7.5 to 9 ft tall and each weights more than 10 tones. Basalt is the most common volcanic rock on earth and on the polished countertop surfaces, Cannell craved chiseled images of family life rendered in a traditional Coastal Salish community environment. The outer rims of these stones are left unfinished to give them a natural edge. The base that the four sculptures stand on has a dark shape which represents a canoe. The stone slabs are designed to be lit from below with embedded lighting at night. The sculpture and a large Zelcova tree are now part of the new landscaping that forms the terrace of the Shadbolt Centre for The Arts which embraces the Deer Lake Park in Burnaby BC. The landscaping design is done by PWL Landscape Architects, the same firm that also worked on the much larger-scale Olympic Village Millennium Water project and the man-made-Habitat Island at the Southeast Falsecreek waterfront.

Thomas Cannell’s work is in the newly-designated Spirit Square in Deer Lake Park where contractors are now working rapidly to finish the renovation in time for the summer festival season which starts in a few days time. The Spirit Square program is part of a sustainable community development project by the BC provincial government to designate a park, plaza or open space for innovative use that citizens can gather for special occasions, community celebrations and other public events. The budget for the entire renovation project is $1.7 million including a $500,000 Spirit Square grant from the BC provincial government.

Cannell’s mother is the famous Coastal Salish artist/sculptor Susan Point whose work can be seen at the Richmond Olympic Oval, UBC Museum of Anthropology, Stanley Park and many other places in Vancouver, Seattle etc. Thomas Cannell named his sculptural work ‘Vitality’. I think that is the word well-chosen not only to represent his own work, but the paintings of the late Jack Shadbolt whose artistic expressions on canvas often embody the excitement one feels when discovering the ‘vitality’ or ‘newness’ of a different culture. In Jack Shadbolt’s case, that was an aboriginal one deeply-rooted in the Pacific Northwest region of British Columbia. In the last 10-15 years of his life in the late 1980s and 1990s, Mr. Shadbolt painted with such exuberant wild colors exploding from within multiple un-constrained forms and shapes. You feel that he was trying to convey the transformation he himself felt to be liberated and to celebrate that freedom that he had experienced by embracing the diversity of the area he was living in. Jack Shadbolt was true to his roots. Though born in England, he came to Victoria, BC with his parents when he was three years old. Jack Shadbolt lived a very active artistic life right to his death in 1998 together with his writer wife, Doris. They married in 1945 and moved to Burnaby in 1950. The Shadbolt Centre for the Arts was opened in 1995 in honor of the couple as a performance and learning center for the visual arts, theater and dance.

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra (VSO) will hold a concert (part of the Symphony In The Park series) at Deer Lake Park on July 11, 2010. Some 10,000 to 12,000 people are expected to attend the free musical event. The Grand Opening of the Spirit Suare’s will take place on Burnaby’s Discovery Day, July 18.

Woman passed by the 'Vitality' Sculpture at Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC

2 of the 4 Basalt Slabs at Shadbolt Centre for the Arts in Burnaby BC

Zelcova Tree and 'Vitality' sculpture at Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC

Sculptural Details of one of the 4 Basalt Slabs at Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC and the surrounding Deer Lake Park

Sculptural Details of one of the 4 Basalt Slabs at Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC

Sculptural Details of one of the 4 Basalt Slabs at Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC
Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, Deer Lake Park, Burnaby BC
Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC, a Performing and Learning Centre for Visual Arts, Theatre and Dance

Srchitecture, Shadolt Centre for the Arts in Burnaby BC

South Terrace and Garden, Shadbolt Centre for the Arts in Burnaby BC
Mother and daughter at Deer Lake Park near Shadbolt Centre for the Arts
Mother and child at Deer Lake Park near Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC
Contractor works to finish Spirit Square Renovation at Shadbolt Centre for the Arts
Worker work to finish the renovation work at Deer Lake Park in Sculptural Details of one of the 4 Basalt Slabs at Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC

Architecture, Sculptural Details of one of the 4 Basalt Slabs at Shadolt Centre for the Arts, Burnaby BC

Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, 6450 Deer Lake Ave, Burnaby BC


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